The Must Have Accessory for Your Next Kite Trip — the NHP Split Kiteboard

When you show up at a “destination” kiting spot with an NHP split kiteboard, you feel like a rockstar. Everyone comes over to see it and some of them ask about it — It is more flexible? Do the pieces feel like they are sliding apart when you’re riding? How is it for jumping? How heavy is it? Is it expensive? Can you please give me a launch? You get it…you feel special.

Everyone also makes all kinds of assumptions about you when you show up with a split kiteboard, including 1) you’re rich and 2) you travel a lot for kiting, enough to need a travel board and 3) you’re a gear-head. And while two of those things may be true, depending on who you are, you DON’T have to be rich to get a split kiteboard. You just have to be smart and want to spend your money on things that you enjoy, not fees that you’ll never get back!

Me…I’m happy to spend money on kite trips–for lessons, local fare, accommodation and even plane tickets. I am less than happy that the airline industry penalizes me for being a kiteboarder and not a golfer, and I know I’m not the only kiter who’s paid tons of fees because I wanted to travel with a surfboard or brought a bag that wasn’t really for golf clubs!

In addition to not wasting money, it’s also a lot less hassle to carry your kiteboard in a back-pack than it is to drag it around in a bag that looks like something you stole from the morgue.

Nobile Split-Kiteboard_1 Nobile Split Kiteboard

My thoughts on the board:

1. Great board for traveling. Hands down, the best. The fact that you don’t ever have to pay an oversized bag fee again makes it worth EVERY PENNY Every one! I carried my board in a Nobile Easy Bag–which easily held the board, one kite, bar, harness, two wetsuits, and a poncho–but I am exchanging if for a Nobile “Check-in” bag because it’s got wheels.

2. Quick, easy and completely tool-less to assemble. The board is a dream, but I’ll admit…the Gen 2 footpads are not as easy to attach as the Gen 1 because of the way the strap is positioned. The strap piece is flatter on the Gen 2, so it’s a little bit of a challenge to get the thumbscrew into the slot and then tighten when it’s on the board. The Gen 2 pads are way more comfy than the Gen 1, but they are a little bit of a pain to put on the board.

3. The ride is great. I didn’t notice any difference between my Xenon LaLuz 129 TT and the 130 NHP. (Ok, some people don’t like my Xenon board and they’ve expressed that opinion…blah blah blah…). Both boards are lightweight, both are smooth on the water. I think that NHP might even be a little better than my Xenon because of the asymetrical shape of the board. Now that I know how convenient the splitboard is to haul around, I may start using it as my regular board for my local NYC area spots. I live in Manhattan and it’s a bitch to take the subway with a golf bag. Now I don’t have to…

4. The board is even better than the previous model. My friend has the new NHP splitboard too, and he loves it. It’s his second Nobile split kiteboard, and he says the new board is even better than the previous model. It’s easier to assemble, the bindings are more comfortable, and he’s noticed a performance improvement from the last model. (Sadly, he lost that board to the sea, in case you’re wondering why he got a new one.)

Nobile NHP Split Kiteboard_3

So, my experience with the board was obvious. I loved it for many reasons. Tt’s got easy, tool-less assembly. There were no airline fees to take it on the plane. It’s hassle free to carry around, and it has better performance than most twintips. I won’t lie…it’s a little more expensive than a regular twintip, but the difference in price will be a non-issue after two or three plane rides.

If you want to find out more details about my board or any of the other Nobile 2018-2019 splitboards? Take a look at Brian’s video:

Happy kiting and good winds!

Kristin Vincenzo

A long time windsurfer, Kristin started kiteboarding about two years ago after finding an amazing community of friendly, helpful kiters in the NYC area. She hasn't touched a sailboard since.